Feb/March Issue of The Voice!

This month, the Young Writers Project digital magazine, The Voice, features some of the best entries from our annual Writes Day, in which we ask schools to stop what they are doing and write for seven minutes -- just to have fun, give each other feedback and share what they wrote. YWP had over 1,600 posts on that day -- a fraction of the actual writing that went on -- and some of it was inspirational. AS ALWAYS, we encourage you to send any youths you know to sign up on youngwritersproject.org to gain skills in writing in a supportive learning network. Thanks, as always, for supporting our work, by giving these kids audience and sending us your donations.

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Thanks for your gifts.

THE YWP ACADEMY -- You Can Help

 

As you know, this site is managed by Young Writers Project, a passionate, small band of people that helps thousands of youths around the U.S. and world become better writers so they can succeed in school, college and beyond. Writing is a vital skill and we believe more needs to be done to help kids become proficient.

By continuing to provide us financial support you help pay for our time -- and the time of leading experts and artists -- to provide youths guidance and encouragement on youngwritersproject.org or leading a workshop.

UPDATE: Your donations are helping an at-risk child participate in our new donation-based formal online learning center, The YWP Academy.

We just finished a highly successful pilot with about 50 youths who tried out our early workshops on YWP Academy. Their feedback led to many small improvements and we soon will begin rolling out monthly workshops for all youths to join. YWP is also beginning partnerships with universities and colleges who will, each month, offer a workshop of their own design. And we plan to have summer workshops specifically for those youths headed college to help them transition into a new type and workload of writing.

And don't forget: Our free, online respectful teen writing community is open to ALL youths ANYWHERE, so if you know some youths who like to write or who want to get better at it, send them to youngwritersproject.org. They will get feedback, support and may get published all over including on our showcase magazine, The Voice!

In this time of relative chaos, I give thanks to the inspiring, creative and optimistic voices of youth!

geoff gevalt

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Do you have a story to tell?

 

TELL YOUR STORIES! This web community is seeking people who like to tell stories about their craft -- whether you be a weaver or a spinner or a farmer or knitter.

BECOME A BLOGGER HERE! No requirements (except to post a story now and again!) No guilt! Fun. Fame (well, maybe among us). It's EASY.

IF YOU HAVE THE URGE TO SHARE something you've done or learned or seen and want to express it to others, contact me at ggevalt@youngwritersproject.org and we'll set you up to blog!

Thanks,

Geoffrey Gevalt

young writers project

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Angora Rabbit Harvest

Angoras do take considerable time and energy, but so does everything in life.  For me, the key is knowing the cycle of each rabbit and keeping a schedule. Sometimes the rabbits don't agree with my schedule. 

The beginning of my rabbits cycles start in May/June. Most of my buns were born late fall/early winter, and I'm sure that has an impact. My entire herd are not regular molters and hold coats 5-7 mos.  I discovered their cycle by trial and error., there is a point between 5-7 mos where little neps begin to form on the ends of the wool, and if I don't collect is, instead of shedding out all around the cage, the coat begins to mat (it's the only time it every mats). If I really wanted, regular grooming could keep that coat past the time. I really can't stand to wait past 5 mos, I want that coat to spin, only show buns are allowed to go past 5. After the big Mini Convention show in May, I begin the clip down so no bunny carries a full coat in the heat of summer. They are clipped again in Sept/Oct, Jan/Feb, May/June. I get one less clipping than those who molt every 90 days, but my fiber tends to be twice as long. 

Processing Fleece 101 (for the rest of us)

Fleece....ahh, c'mon, you've dreamt of it, you've seen it, you've run your hands over, through and gathered up handfuls of the stuff, wanting it at some point in your time as a fleece fanatic. Yeah, you, c'mon, admit it

Fleece in its raw state, whether it be wool, llama, alpaca, quivit (drool), comes off an animal, usually sheared, sometimes combed. Here in the US, we are blessed with a range of both breeds (& breeders) as well as multiple climates that enable us to grow out hundreds of varieties of animals to choose their fluffiness from

Jenkins Turkish

I will soon have Jenkins Turkish spindles on my web page again.  This is so exciting.  I will let you know when I'm able to get them photographed and on the site.

Thanks everyone who came to Rhinebeck and bought MANY spindles.

 

 

Please stop by

Janet

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SOLD Items

When you sell you itemPlease do not mark sold.  PLEASE remove it from the list. 

Your effort is appreciated.

 

Thank you

Janet

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